Archive for May, 2009

Anonymous Banker Asks: “Did our country’s leading banks lose their SBA lending rights”

Saturday, May 16th, 2009

In light of the devastatingly poor SBA lending results and the fact that the SBA has been dragging their feet in implementing the new lending programs dictated by the Economic Recovery Act, I started reading deep into the bowels of the SBA website and the Code of Federal Regulations that govern the criteria banks must meet in order to have SBA lending and SBA securitization status.

And after doing so, one has to wonder if ANY of our leading banks are qualified, under clearly defined government regulations,  to partipate in the SBA lending programs.

The SBA Website and  the Code on Federal Regulation  states that the banks have to meet these criteria:

1.  Operate in a safe and sound condition using commercially reasonable lending policies, procedures, and standards employed by prudent Lenders. 

That rule alone takes most of our banks off the SBA lending list.  They all violated the regulations on safety and soundness and in so doing created this nation’s economic crisis .

2.   Have continuing good character and reputation, and otherwise meet and maintain the ethical requirements of §120.140

Dictionary.com defines reputation as  the estimation in which a person or thing is held, especially by the community or the public generally.  How many of our nation’s leading banks would be considered by our general population to have a good reputation?   I can’t think of any, can you?

3.  Holding sufficient permanent capital to support SBA lending activities (for SBA Lenders with a Federal Financial Institution Regulator, meeting capital requirements for an adequately capitalized financial institution is considered sufficient permanent capital to support SBA lending activities)

Based on the recent stress test results and our governments demands that the following banks raise additional capital:  Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Citigroup, Regions, SunTrust, Fifth Third, PNC and KeyCorp; can one imagine that these banks have met the requirements to be adequately capitalized?  If they were, then why would we be demanding that they raise additional capital?  Does that mean that somehow, behind the scenes, these banks have been told that they don’t qualify as SBA lenders?  Is it any wonder that our Small Business Community can’t find any SBA lenders among the biggest banks that took our taxdollars in the bailout? 

Based on this information and what I see each day as a banker to the Small Business Community, it is my general opinion that our government leaders are completely and intentionally fooling us into believing that there is any support intended for the Small Business Community.  It simply is not so!

 

SBA Securitization Market

If my suspicions are correct, then I think it is incumbent upon the Small Business Administration to direct the small business owner accordingly and come clean with the general public.

The Code of Federal Regulations CFR 120.4 also defines the conditions that need to be met for a bank to securitize their SBA loans.  And this is where it gets really interesting.  Our leaders expound on the need to get the securitization markets flowing in order to stimulate lending and the future of our economic recovery.  This mission is the foundation on which the TALF program was built and at the core of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.  Yet, based on the criteria defined in CFR 120.4, it is unlikely that any of our lead banks will be able to securitize SBA loans.  If SBA loans cannot be securitized, then that would mean that the banks would have to hold them on their books, and we all know that isn’t going to happen.

Here are a few of the guidelines, but I recommend that you all read the code in its entirety:

1.  Securitization —A “securitization” is the pooling and sale of the unguaranteed portion of SBA guaranteed loans to a trust, special purpose vehicle, or other mechanism, and the issuance of securities backed by those loans to investors in either a private placement or public offering.

2.  A Lender may only securitize 7(a) loans that will be fully disbursed within 90 days of the securitization’s closing date.  If  the amount of a fully disbursed loan increases after a securitization settles, the Lender must retain the increased amount.

This part pretty much kills any chance of a small business obtaining an SBA working capital line under the 7(a) program. 

3.  Have satisfactory SBA performance, as determined by SBA in its discretion. The Lender’s Risk Rating, among other factors, will be considered in determining satisfactory SBA performance. Other factors may include, but are not limited to, on-site review/examination assessments, historical performance measures (like default rate, purchase rate and loss rate), loan volume to the extent that it impacts performance measures, and other performance related measurements and information (such as contribution toward SBA mission);

Which part of the SBA’s Guiding Principles  is our banking industy supporting as they systematically withdraw credit from small business, systematically increase business credit card rates to upwards of 25% and have generally refused to support the small business owner through any meaningful lending programs?

According to IRS.gov, in 2006 (the most updated numbers they had)  there were 22 million sole proprietor tax returns filed in 2006 and an additional 3.2 million S-corp returns filed for businesses with revenue under $1 million dollars.  These companies generated over 1.2 trillion dollars in revenue and paid salaries of over $200 Billion dollars and rent (supporting our nations commercial property owners) of over $70 Billion dollars.

If the Big Banks are not going to support this group through meaningful lending programs, then perhaps it is time for Ms. Mills and the SBA to focus on providing  the incentives and support required for the community banks to increase their lending initiatives to the local markets they serve so well.

Our regulators have failed us in the past and I’d like to know if  the SBA is  enforcing the regulations that are in place that dictate exactly what banks are allowed to participate in SBA lending and securitizations.  I think that in light of the new transparency rules supported by President Obama, we have a right to know if the lead banks are simply refusing to participate in SBA lending or if they have been justifiably banned from participating for non-compliance of our goverment regulations. 
 
If my suspicions are correct, then I think it is incumbent upon your office to direct the small business owner accordingly and come clean with the general public.
 

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Anonymous Banker Weighs In on the Slashing of Credit to our Small Business Community

Friday, May 8th, 2009
In response to a recent article over at Business Week, “Snipping Credit lines for Small Businesses”, which discusses how JPMorgan Chase and others are slashing small-business lending in an effort to shore up their balance sheets, I must, unfortunately, question the use of the word ‘snipping’–which, to me, sounds like a tiny trim. Au contraire. Dig deeper and you will find that banks are slashing tens of billions of dollars in credit to our nation’s small business owners.

Does the Obama administration care about small-business credit? It certainly says it does. A typical press release from the Treasury Department avows as much.

But is this for real? Or it this simply rhetoric? As a business banker, I sit in my office each day and deal with small business owners, which I define as those with annual revenue up to $10 million, but often less than $1 million. I see their worried faces as they come into the bank, letter in hand, wondering why their credit lines were frozen. These people need help, and so far as I can tell, they’re not getting it from the administration.

I took a random sampling of approximately 360 lines that received letters similar to the one described in the Business Week article. These 360 accounts represented $20 million in potential money loaned out, which actually owed just over $12 million. About seventy accounts had no balances outstanding and represented $4 million in potential credit. This particular bank (and I’m sorry I can’t identify it for our readers) froze all these lines to any further draws, with an intent to term them out. Based on this sampling, the average credit facility was just over $50,000.

At first glance, these numbers don’t appear devastating, especially when the new buzz words being bandied about are in the billions and trillions. But my sampling is just a drop in the bucket. Imagine that this is happening not to 360 businesses but to 36,000 businesses in one bank. That results in $2 billion in cancelled credit lines. Now imagine that each of the five largest banks (and I’m being gracious) have taken similar action, resulting in the systematic cancellation of 180,000 lines. That would mean that more than $20 billion of working capital has been taken away from the U.S. small business community. I personally believe that the results are much larger than even this.

I understand the need for all banks to recognize the quality or deterioration of loans they hold on their books and their need to effectively reserve for losses, particularly in these trying economic times. But it has been my experience that many of these borrowers never even missed a payment and have met their commitments as agreed.

And what about the prospect of converting credit lines to term loans? Business Week points out, “Business owners who accept the conversion to a term loan will likely see dramatically higher monthly payments.” Once again, a good point; and once again, a drastic understatement. Working capital lines of credit often have monthly payments equal to interest only. They may, in some cases, carry a minimum principal payment equal to 1% of the outstanding loan amount (it depends on the bank and their rules under the original loan agreement).

Take a $50,000 loan at a rate of Prime +2%. Under the interest-only scenario, the monthly payment would be $218.75. If a principal payment of 1% is required, the monthly payment would be $718.75. However, the same $50,000 loan termed out over five years (and with an increase in rate to between 7.5% and 10%) would now carry a monthly payment of just over $1000! So the end result of converting lines to term loans is that the banks have increased the monthly payments for the small business owner by at least 40% across the board while cancelling their access to future working capital.

Let me make this clear to President Obama. Not only are the banks not making business loans to small business owners, they are systematically withdrawing billions of dollars in credit lines from the small business market.

While our president is rallying our Congressional leaders in support of his positions on credit card reform–reform that is likely to exempt small business owners, by the way–he may want to share these observations from the front lines of the banking world so that our leaders can begin to understand and focus their efforts on protecting our nation’s small business community.

Cross Posted at BizBox

 

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